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How to Keep Your Pets in a Bad Economy


 

As someone who’s spent years rescuing animals that other people didn’t want anymore, a downturn in the economy is cause for concern. While many folks do whatever it takes to hang on to their pets, others seem to discard them with little or no regard for their future, seemingly unaware that help is available. Shelters overflow with family pets that could’ve stayed with their owners, had those owners done a little homework rather than simply surrendered Fluffy or Spot. If you have concerns about continuing to care for your pet in this shaky economy, read on.
The first phone call you should make is to your local humane society. If they don’t offer a pet food bank, they should know who in your area does. They should also be able to refer you to an agency that fosters animals. Foster folks might be willing to take care of your critter until you’re back on your feet.
If you have a purebred pet, a local club whose members all own the same breed might have some resources for you. They, too, should know where to obtain free pet food, or perhaps someone willing to foster your animal.
In addition, your city’s Animal Control Officer often has unofficial resources. He’ll know which veterinarian offers cut-rate fees for hard-luck cases, and who in the community is actively involved in animal rescues. And don’t let his title fool you: many AC Officers are animal-lovers, too!
And, since you’re on the computer reading this, don’t forget about social networking sites! Facebook alone is chock-full of groups and individuals who rescue critters. Each and every one of them has resources available just a mouse click away, all across the globe. They, too, can help you find assistance in your area.
While losing your job or home can create terrible turmoil, having to surrender a beloved pet might just be the worst part of such an ordeal. Jobs and homes are replaceable, the family pet is not. With a little research, though, you might find that, even in a bad economy, it is possible to care for your pets.
Kelly Meister, Author
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About the Author: Kelly Meister is a writer, animal photographer, and potter. She shares her life with four cats, ten ducks, and a barn full of ornery horses. Based on her years of experience rescuing animals in need, Kelly also acts as an advocate for their care and humane treatment. When she’s not taking riding lessons or volunteering at a horse rescue facility, Kelly waits on her cats hand and foot. Check out her blog, Kelly’s Critter Talk, at www.kellyscrittertalk.blogspot.com. Her first book, Crazy Critter Lady, is available at amazon.com.

 

pet-assistanceToday's guest experts gives us some great advice for keeping your pets and affording to take care of them even if you've lost your job or have had to take a pay cut. See what she recommends for resources to keep you and your pets together.

 

Keeping Your Pets in a Bad Economy

As someone who’s spent years rescuing animals that other people didn’t want anymore, a downturn in the economy is cause for concern. While many folks do whatever it takes to hang on to their pets, others seem to discard them with little or no regard for their future, seemingly unaware that help is available. Shelters overflow with family pets that could’ve stayed with their owners, had those owners done a little homework rather than simply surrendered Fluffy or Spot. If you have concerns about continuing to care for your pet in this shaky economy, read on.

The first phone call you should make is to your local humane society. If they don’t offer a pet food bank, they should know who in your area does. They should also be able to refer you to an agency that fosters animals. Foster folks might be willing to take care of your critter until you’re back on your feet.

If you have a purebred pet, a local club whose members all own the same breed might have some resources for you. They, too, should know where to obtain free pet food, or perhaps someone willing to foster your animal.

In addition, your city’s Animal Control Officer often has unofficial resources. He’ll know which veterinarian offers cut-rate fees for hard-luck cases, and who in the community is actively involved in animal rescues. And don’t let his title fool you: many AC Officers are animal-lovers, too!

And, since you’re on the computer reading this, don’t forget about social networking sites! Facebook alone is chock-full of groups and individuals who rescue critters. Each and every one of them has resources available just a mouse click away, all across the globe. They, too, can help you find assistance in your area.

While losing your job or home can create terrible turmoil, having to surrender a beloved pet might just be the worst part of such an ordeal. Jobs and homes are replaceable, the family pet is not. With a little research, though, you might find that, even in a bad economy, it is possible to care for your pets.

-- Kelly Meister, Author

####

About the Author: Kelly Meister is a writer, animal photographer, and potter. She shares her life with four cats, ten ducks, and a barn full of ornery horses. Based on her years of experience rescuing animals in need, Kelly also acts as an advocate for their care and humane treatment. When she’s not taking riding lessons or volunteering at a horse rescue facility, Kelly waits on her cats hand and foot. Check out her blog, Kelly’s Critter Talk, at www.kellyscrittertalk.blogspot.com. Her first book, Crazy Critter Lady, is available at amazon.com.